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Nonfiction 8

Plant Relationships: Part A by George C. Carroll (auth.), Professor Dr. George C. Carroll,

By George C. Carroll (auth.), Professor Dr. George C. Carroll, Professor Dr. Paul Tudzynski (eds.)

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Conidia in acervuli are surrounded by extracellular mucilage which is not involved in adhesion Adhesion of Spores and Hyphae to Plant Surfaces 17 Fig. lA-Co An ungerminated conidium of Colletotrichum graminicoia adhered to polystyrene. A Thirty minutes after contact with the substratum, the cunidium (e) was fixed for microscopy. B The conidium in A was micromanipulated away from the polystyrene. Arrows indicate fungal material along the conidium-substratum interface. C An enlarged view of the material (arrows) released from the conidium (e) as shown in B.

4. Aeciospores ......................... C. Regulation of Conidial Germination ....... 1. Self-Inhibitors ................... 2. Surface Components ................... 3. Physical Cues ..... . . . D. Spore Eclosion ........ III. Germling Differentiation ........... A. Physical Cues ........ 1. Hydrophobicity ... ............... 2. Hardness ............................. 3. Thigmotropism ....................... a) Pores ........ b) Stomata ........................... c) Mechanisms of Thigmotropism .......

The 90-kDa glycoprotein is macroconidal-specific; the compound is not present on microconidia, which are relatively nonadherent. Because conidia germinate but do not adhere in V8 broth or in the defined medium, the production of material which is labeled with Con A at the site of initial attachment and the production of the 90-kDa glycoprotein are specifically associated with adhesion and not with the initiation of the germination process. Con A prevents adhesion, but not germination, of macroconidia.

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